Diploma electives course list

Spring 2024 General Education electives

Please note: offerings vary from term-to-term and not all electives are suitable for all programs. If the course is not suitable, you will be restricted from registering for it in the Student Portal and will need to select another option.

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Browse the elective courses offered this term:

Avatars to Vampires

Theme
Arts in Society
Course Code
LIBS1940 (Section 2)
Delivery
In person
Status
Registration opens April 15
Description
Do you sometimes feel more at home battling strangers’ avatars in a war zone than walking down the halls of your own school? Or do you ever wonder why humans have suddenly decided that predatory monsters like vampires might make good lovers? Useful answers to these questions require a clear understanding of human identity. Over time, our ideas about identity have undergone many changes in terms of human nature and value.

Science Fiction

Theme
Arts in Society
Course Code
LIBS1930 (Section 2, 3)
Delivery
Online - Synchronous
Status
Registration opens April 15
Description
This course will explore science fiction which deals with the effects of possible changes in the levels of science and technology on individual human beings and their societies. Drawing on literature, film, T.V., and other aspects of popular culture, students will examine themes such as utopias, dystopias, space travel, artificial intelligence, aliens, gender roles, etc. and will develop an awareness of both the implications of the transformation of our present technological knowledge and the ethical issues which will face us all. Students will understand the role of science fiction as one of the most popular and thought provoking genres of this century and the next generation.

The Pleasure and Purpose of Music

Theme
Arts in Society
Course Code
LIBS1480 (Section 3)
Delivery
Online - Synchronous
Status
Registration opens April 15
Description
How would you describe the music you've heard in a sacred space? What's your favourite movie soundtrack? What kind of music do you listen to with your friends, and how is it different from the music you might hear in a park or on the street? The goal of this course is to enable students to understand the materials of music and music in four main social contexts throughout history — music in sacred spaces, music for stage and screen, music among friends, and music in public spaces. Musical developments will be explored from ancient to modern times. Through interactive activities and discussions, students will discover how music can both bring us pleasure and have a purpose in our lives.

The Pleasure and Purpose of Music

Theme
Arts in Society
Course Code
LIBS1480 (Section 4)
Delivery
In person
Status
Registration opens April 15
Description
How would you describe the music you've heard in a sacred space? What's your favourite movie soundtrack? What kind of music do you listen to with your friends, and how is it different from the music you might hear in a park or on the street? The goal of this course is to enable students to understand the materials of music and music in four main social contexts throughout history — music in sacred spaces, music for stage and screen, music among friends, and music in public spaces. Musical developments will be explored from ancient to modern times. Through interactive activities and discussions, students will discover how music can both bring us pleasure and have a purpose in our lives.

Your Life Through Story

Theme
Arts in Society
Course Code
LIBS1265 (Section 1)
Delivery
Online - Synchronous
Status
Registration opens April 15
Description
The purpose of this course is to explore how autobiography and memoir can help us connect to the times, places, and people that matter to us. Students will be introduced to a selection of storytelling traditions, frameworks, devices, and techniques for written, oral, and visual narratives. Students will learn how to experience, appreciate, and analyze life stories from diverse cultures and communities, and will also practice telling stories from their own lives in the service of achieving their personal and professional goals.

Viewing Philosophy Through Film

Theme
Arts in Society / Personal Understanding
Course Code
LIBS1660 (Section 3)
Delivery
Online - Synchronous
Status
Registration opens April 15
Description
In this course, we will learn about philosophy by watching and discussing great works of cinema. What can the screen upon which moving images are projected teach us about science, the question of God, the pursuit of knowledge, ethics, reality, violence, love, hope, evil, nothingness, absurdity and ourselves as human beings? Students who complete this course will have a good working knowledge of the history of philosophy. Reading selections may vary from year to year. This course you will help students to inquire into complex problems and begin to formulate their own philosophy. Students will learn effective methods of inquiry, analysis, and criticism. The study of philosophy develops one's ability to think carefully and critically. The objective of this course is to enable students to be reflective about the beliefs that they or their society have developed. The ability to think reflectively does not develop independently from the ability to read critically and perceptively or the ability to express ourselves. Thus, in this course we will seek to advance our reading comprehension as well as our communication skills, both oral and written.

Viewing Philosophy Through Film

Theme
Arts in Society / Personal Understanding
Course Code
LIBS1660 (Section 4)
Delivery
In person
Status
Registration opens April 15
Description
In this course, we will learn about philosophy by watching and discussing great works of cinema. What can the screen upon which moving images are projected teach us about science, the question of God, the pursuit of knowledge, ethics, reality, violence, love, hope, evil, nothingness, absurdity and ourselves as human beings? Students who complete this course will have a good working knowledge of the history of philosophy. Reading selections may vary from year to year. This course you will help students to inquire into complex problems and begin to formulate their own philosophy. Students will learn effective methods of inquiry, analysis, and criticism. The study of philosophy develops one's ability to think carefully and critically. The objective of this course is to enable students to be reflective about the beliefs that they or their society have developed. The ability to think reflectively does not develop independently from the ability to read critically and perceptively or the ability to express ourselves. Thus, in this course we will seek to advance our reading comprehension as well as our communication skills, both oral and written.

Introduction to World Culture

Theme
Arts in Society / Social and Cultural Understanding / Personal Understanding / Civic Life
Course Code
LIBS1680 (Section 2)
Delivery
Online - Synchronous
Status
Registration opens April 15
Description
In order to enhance an individual's sense of personal understanding and contribution to civic life, there must be a willingness and ability to appreciate others' cultural similarities and differences. In this course, students will, through a variety of mediums, examine a number of world cultures, specifically their economic, environmental, political, and social characteristics while furthering a respect for cultural and religious diversity.

Introduction to the Social Sciences

Theme
Civic Life
Course Code
LIBS1520 (Section 2,3)
Delivery
Online - Synchronous
Status
Registration opens April 15
Description
In order to live responsibly and to reach ones potential as an individual, and as a citizen of society, there is a need to understand the patterns of human relationships that underlie the orderly interactions of a society's various structural units. Informed people have knowledge of the meaning of civic life in relation to diverse communities at the local, national and global level. This course will teach the basic principles and vocabulary of the social science disciplines — economics, sociology, and politics. It will introduce students to the intellectual frameworks of these disciplines and will emphasize the development of critical thinking by focusing on inequalities in contemporary Canadian society. Students will be provided with an understanding of the meaning of freedoms, rights, and participation in community and public life, in addition to a working knowledge of the structure and function of various levels of governments in Canada. The course will contribute to the development of citizens who are conscious of the diversity, complexity, and richness of the human experience, who are able to establish meaning through this consciousness, and, who, as a result, are able to contribute thoughtfully, creatively, and positively to the society in which they live and work.

Student Success in Higher Learning

Theme
Civic Life / Personal Understanding
Course Code
LIBS1540 (Section 11)
Delivery
In person
Status
Registration opens April 15
Description
This course enables students to know and believe in themselves by taking advantage of resources and opportunities that will support their success in college. Students will identify their unique learning styles and develop strategies for achieving their academic, career and personal goals for reaching personal satisfaction.

Student Success in Higher Learning

Theme
Civic Life / Personal Understanding
Course Code
LIBS1540 (Section 12)
Delivery
Online - Synchronous
Status
Registration opens April 15
Description
This course enables students to know and believe in themselves by taking advantage of resources and opportunities that will support their success in college. Students will identify their unique learning styles and develop strategies for achieving their academic, career and personal goals for reaching personal satisfaction.

Essentials of Canadian History

Theme
Civic Life / Social and Cultural Understanding
Course Code
LIBS1160 (Section 2,3,4)
Delivery
Online - Synchronous
Status
Registration opens April 15
Description
This course is a study of some of the major themes of Canadian history from Confederation to the present. It is designed to increase the student’s understanding of how our past influences and engages with the present, and how we are shaping our future.

Multiculturalism: Canadian Diversity Project

Theme
Civic Life / Social and Cultural Understanding
Course Code
LIBS1580 (Section 2)
Delivery
Online - Synchronous
Status
Registration opens April 15
Description
In this course students will critically identify and examine issues of diversity in Canada. Students will examine and appraise past, present, and future issues of the Canadian multicultural and diversity project. Students will develop an understanding of the impact of colonialism on the Indigenous Peoples, the immigration policies of a developing country, the legal and social impacts of the Canadian Multicultural Act and the Charter of Rights and Freedoms, and the struggle for identity maintenance in French Quebec and among Indigenous Peoples. This course will examine the experience of new Canadians and the challenges of developing a national identity. Issues of emerging concepts such as 'the global citizen' will also be examined.

Human Sexuality

Theme
Personal Understanding
Course Code
LIBS1260 (Section 4,5)
Delivery
Online - Synchronous
Status
Registration opens April 15
Description
The purpose of this course is to understand the essential dimensions of Human Sexuality which include psychological, physiological and sociological perspectives. The student will be able to describe and critically discuss many aspects of sexual behaviour and critically examine personal attitudes towards various sexual expression.

Environmental Science

Theme
Science and Technology
Course Code
LIBS1910 (Section 3)
Delivery
In person
Status
Registration opens April 15
Description
This course will focus on all the natural elements of the environment. Man will be treated as just one of those elements. How man uses and abuses other elements will be balanced with the study of changes that man can neither cause nor prevent. Population growth study will be balanced by comparing developed nations with developing ones and their respective lifestyles. Debate from all sides of any issue will be critical. Group seminars will bring the Canadian and local experience to the classroom.

Environmental Science

Theme
Science and Technology
Course Code
LIBS1910 (Section 4)
Delivery
Online - Synchronous
Status
Registration opens April 15
Description
This course will focus on all the natural elements of the environment. Man will be treated as just one of those elements. How man uses and abuses other elements will be balanced with the study of changes that man can neither cause nor prevent. Population growth study will be balanced by comparing developed nations with developing ones and their respective lifestyles. Debate from all sides of any issue will be critical. Group seminars will bring the Canadian and local experience to the classroom.

Intro to Astronomy

Theme
Science and Technology
Course Code
LIBS1170 (Section 3)
Delivery
In person
Status
Registration opens April 15
Description
In this course, the student will acquire a basic understanding of the universe, what it is made of, and the inter-relationships between galaxies, stars, and planets. The course begins with a brief overview of astronomy including discussions on the motion of stars and planets, the cycles of the moon, the history of astronomy, and an introduction to telescopes. In the next section of this course, students learn about our solar system with an emphasis on comparative planetology, and will take part in discussions of life on other planets. The course continues with a deeper understanding of stars: what they are made of, how they are formed, and how they evolve. In the final part, students will take a look at the nature of galaxies, cosmology, and current ideas regarding space and time.

Trekking Through Political Economy with Sci Fi

Theme
Science and Technology
Course Code
LIBS2070 (Section 3)
Delivery
In person
Status
Registration opens April 15
Description
Political economy is a broad field about the relationship(s) between politics and economies. Science fiction is one channel that creates imaginary and imaginative stories for us to think about our own world. This course also allows students to study a political economic issue of their choice through science fiction. This course identifies and analyzes key political and economic themes and lessons from the Star Wars and Star Trek universes. Topics may include, but are not limited to, studying characters’ decisions; the politics of economic policies; representations of intersectionality; and the impact of political economic systems on individuals.

Weather and Climate

Theme
Science and Technology
Course Code
LIBS1460 (Section 2)
Delivery
Online - Synchronous
Status
Registration opens April 15
Description
Focuses on principles that enable students to attain basic understanding of the atmosphere and its processes. Students examine how information is gathered and presented in a weather forecast. They investigate human activity and its impact on ozone depletion, air quality and climate.

Artificial Intelligence: Rise of the Machines

Theme
Social and Cultural Understanding
Course Code
LIBS1095 (Section 4,9)
Delivery
Online - Synchronous
Status
Registration opens April 15
Description
Have you ever wondered if humans will eventually fall in love with robots? Do you question what robots think about when they are alone or if robots will eventually be able to dream? Do you worry that we may face a future of robotic soldiers and unmanned war machines? All of these questions are related to the field of artificial intelligence. Artificial intelligence (AI) is defined as the theory and development of computer systems able to perform tasks that normally require human intelligence, such as visual perception, speech recognition, decision-making, and translation between languages. In this course, you will be introduced to artificial intelligence and how it impacts or will impact both individuals and society in general. We will learn about the history and definition of intelligence and artificial intelligence, and real life applications and possible implications of AI, and will explore beliefs about AI and what the future holds for both humans and artificial machines. Emphasis will be placed on understanding the moral and ethical implications of AI.

Cults & Terrorism

Theme
Social and Cultural Understanding
Course Code
LIBS1103 (Section 5)
Delivery
Online - Synchronous
Status
Registration opens April 15
Description
In this course students will explore the historical evolution and social impact of cults and terrorist groups. Students will learn ways to identify and define cults. Using discussions and active learning approaches, students will examine what motivates cults and terrorist groups with a specific lens towards violent activity. The impact of media and globalization will also be discussed. Students will advance their social and cultural understanding and gain awareness of the place of cults in contemporary society. Students in this course will discuss the validity of historical evidence and research historical interpretations of events using relevant and recent sources.

Every Child Matters

Theme
Social and Cultural Understanding
Course Code
LIBS1235 (Section 2)
Delivery
Online - Synchronous
Status
Registration opens April 15
Description
This course unpacks traditional childrearing practices, the role of children in Indigenous communities from pre-contact until today, how the traditional Indigenous family structure differs in terms of childrearing, and responsibilities of both children and caregivers. It traces the journey from Residential schools to 60s scoop to the current state of Indigenous child welfare today, exploring on and off reserve education for Indigenous children, as well as issues faced by Indigenous children in contemporary colonial school systems. Issues in health care, Jordan's Principle, treaty rights for Indigenous children will also be covered.

Indigenous Peoples' Experience with Loss and Recovery

Theme
Social and Cultural Understanding
Course Code
LIBS1255 (Section 1)
Delivery
Online - Asynchronous / Synchronous
Status
Registration opens April 15
Description
This foundational course unpacks the history of Indigenous peoples in Canada and the role of the Indian Act in establishing colonial systems in which Indigenous peoples were not meant to thrive and survive. Often Indigenous individuals, families and communities struggle accessing culturally relevant and responsive services. Many report feeling further marginalized, misunderstood and discriminated against when attempting to seek out assistance across many different industries, including but not limited to education, health care and justice systems, as well as across public service sectors. The aim of this course is to unpack the history of colonialism, examine the impact on present day Indigenous communities, and establish more effective and better informed approaches and protocols for working with Indigenous communities. Participants will come away with a better understanding of the importance of the TRC's 94 Calls to action and their responsibility to take an active role in achieving these goals as professionals.

World Religions

Theme
Social and Cultural Understanding
Course Code
LIBS1110 (Section 2)
Delivery
Online - Synchronous
Status
Registration opens April 15
Description
This course is designed to increase awareness and appreciation of the religious diversity of our global and local communities, and to develop inter-religious understanding through reflection on various religions' responses to universal human issues. Specifically, this course will examine the origin, development, worldview and values of Religions originating in the Americas and Africa, Indian Religions including Hinduism, Jainism, Sikhism and Buddhism, Chinese and Japanese religions including Taoism, Confucianism and Shinto. We will study the religions arising from the Family of Abraham including Judaism, Christianity and Islam. We will also examine the ancient religions of Iraq and Iran. Finally, we will investigate some of the alternative religions including the Baha’i, the Church of Satan, Wicca, and Scientology. Moreover, this course will explore how the deeply rooted nature of our religious convictions has both the power to give meaning and passion to our human chaos, but also to debase, and even destroy our humanity. Students will have opportunity to consider their own religious expectations and values and to analyze their impact on personal goals.

Pleasure and Purpose of Music

Theme
Arts in Society
Course Code
LIBS1480 (Section 5)
Delivery
Online - Synchronous
Status
Registration opens April 15
Description
How would you describe the music you've heard in a sacred space? What's your favourite movie soundtrack? What kind of music do you listen to with your friends, and how is it different from the music you might hear in a park or on the street? The goal of this course is to enable students to understand the materials of music and music in four main social contexts throughout history — music in sacred spaces, music for stage and screen, music among friends, and music in public spaces. Musical developments will be explored from ancient to modern times. Through interactive activities and discussions, students will discover how music can both bring us pleasure and have a purpose in our lives.

Science Fiction

Theme
Arts in Society
Course Code
LIBS1930 (Section 1)
Delivery
In person
Status
Registration opens April 15
Description
This course will explore science fiction which deals with the effects of possible changes in the levels of science and technology on individual human beings and their societies. Drawing on literature, film, T.V., and other aspects of popular culture, students will examine themes such as utopias, dystopias, space travel, artificial intelligence, aliens, gender roles, etc. and will develop an awareness of both the implications of the transformation of our present technological knowledge and the ethical issues which will face us all. Students will understand the role of science fiction as one of the most popular and thought provoking genres of this century and the next generation.

Viewing Philosophy Through Film

Theme
Arts in Society / Personal Understanding
Course Code
LIBS1660 (Section 1)
Delivery
Online - Synchronous
Status
Registration opens April 15
Description
In this course, we will learn about philosophy by watching and discussing great works of cinema. What can the screen upon which moving images are projected teach us about science, the question of God, the pursuit of knowledge, ethics, reality, violence, love, hope, evil, nothingness, absurdity and ourselves as human beings? Students who complete this course will have a good working knowledge of the history of philosophy. Reading selections may vary from year to year. This course you will help students to inquire into complex problems and begin to formulate their own philosophy. Students will learn effective methods of inquiry, analysis, and criticism. The study of philosophy develops one's ability to think carefully and critically. The objective of this course is to enable students to be reflective about the beliefs that they or their society have developed. The ability to think reflectively does not develop independently from the ability to read critically and perceptively or the ability to express ourselves. Thus, in this course we will seek to advance our reading comprehension as well as our communication skills, both oral and written.

Introduction to Social Sciences

Theme
Civic Life
Course Code
LIBS1520 (Section 9, 10)
Delivery
Online - Synchronous
Status
Registration opens April 15
Description
In order to live responsibly and to reach ones potential as an individual, and as a citizen of society, there is a need to understand the patterns of human relationships that underlie the orderly interactions of a society's various structural units. Informed people have knowledge of the meaning of civic life in relation to diverse communities at the local, national and global level. This course will teach the basic principles and vocabulary of the social science disciplines — economics, sociology, and politics. It will introduce students to the intellectual frameworks of these disciplines and will emphasize the development of critical thinking by focusing on inequalities in contemporary Canadian society. Students will be provided with an understanding of the meaning of freedoms, rights, and participation in community and public life, in addition to a working knowledge of the structure and function of various levels of governments in Canada. The course will contribute to the development of citizens who are conscious of the diversity, complexity, and richness of the human experience, who are able to establish meaning through this consciousness, and, who, as a result, are able to contribute thoughtfully, creatively, and positively to the society in which they live and work.

Introduction to the Social Sciences

Theme
Civic Life
Course Code
LIBS1520 (Section 1)
Delivery
In person
Status
Registration opens April 15
Description
In order to live responsibly and to reach ones potential as an individual, and as a citizen of society, there is a need to understand the patterns of human relationships that underlie the orderly interactions of a society's various structural units. Informed people have knowledge of the meaning of civic life in relation to diverse communities at the local, national and global level. This course will teach the basic principles and vocabulary of the social science disciplines — economics, sociology, and politics. It will introduce students to the intellectual frameworks of these disciplines and will emphasize the development of critical thinking by focusing on inequalities in contemporary Canadian society. Students will be provided with an understanding of the meaning of freedoms, rights, and participation in community and public life, in addition to a working knowledge of the structure and function of various levels of governments in Canada. The course will contribute to the development of citizens who are conscious of the diversity, complexity, and richness of the human experience, who are able to establish meaning through this consciousness, and, who, as a result, are able to contribute thoughtfully, creatively, and positively to the society in which they live and work.

Student Success for Higher Learning

Theme
Civic Life / Personal Understanding
Course Code
LIBS1540 (Section 8)
Delivery
Online - Synchronous
Status
Registration opens April 15
Description
This course enables students to know and believe in themselves by taking advantage of resources and opportunities that will support their success in college. Students will identify their unique learning styles and develop strategies for achieving their academic, career and personal goals for reaching personal satisfaction.

Concepts in Gender

Theme
Personal Understanding
Course Code
LIBS1055 (Section 1)
Delivery
In person
Status
Registration opens April 15
Description
This course will familiarize students with the key contemporary and historical issues and concepts of gender diversity. These issues will be examined from an interdisciplinary perspective. Students will examine the intersection between gender and sexuality and such realities as social class, age, race, ethnicity, health status and colonialism. Gender and sexuality-based power differences will be a theme throughout the course.

Human Sexuality

Theme
Personal Understanding
Course Code
LIBS1260 (Section 1)
Delivery
Online - Synchronous
Status
Registration opens April 15
Description
The purpose of this course is to understand the essential dimensions of Human Sexuality which include psychological, physiological and sociological perspectives. The student will be able to describe and critically discuss many aspects of sexual behaviour and critically examine personal attitudes towards various sexual expression.

Introduction to Astronomy

Theme
Science and Technology
Course Code
LIBS1170 (Section 1)
Delivery
In person
Status
Registration opens April 15
Description
In this course, the student will acquire a basic understanding of the universe, what it is made of, and the inter-relationships between galaxies, stars, and planets. The course begins with a brief overview of astronomy including discussions on the motion of stars and planets, the cycles of the moon, the history of astronomy, and an introduction to telescopes. In the next section of this course, students learn about our solar system with an emphasis on comparative planetology, and will take part in discussions of life on other planets. The course continues with a deeper understanding of stars — what they are made of, how they are formed, and how they evolve. In the final part, students will take a look at the nature of galaxies, cosmology, and current ideas regarding space and time.

Oceans

Theme
Science and Technology
Course Code
LIBS1035 (Section 1, 2)
Delivery
Online - Synchronous
Status
Registration opens April 15
Description
This course will help students to appreciate the interactions that occur between various natural processes in the oceans on a planetary scale. The students will develop an enhanced awareness of how the oceans influence humans’ everyday life. They will better understand the processes that shape and transform the components of the Earth systems from planetary and regional prospective.

Trekking Through Political Economy with Sci Fi

Theme
Science and Technology
Course Code
LIBS2070 (Section 1)
Delivery
In person
Status
Registration opens April 15
Description
Political economy is a broad field about the relationship(s) between politics and economies. Science fiction is one channel that creates imaginary and imaginative stories for us to think about our own world. This course also allows students to study a political economic issue of their choice through science fiction. This course identifies and analyzes key political and economic themes and lessons from the Star Wars and Star Trek universes. Topics may include, but are not limited to, studying characters’ decisions; the politics of economic policies; representations of intersectionality; and the impact of political economic systems on individuals.

Artificial Intelligence: Rise of the Machines

Theme
Social and Cultural Understanding
Course Code
LIBS1095 (Section 1,2,7)
Delivery
Online - Synchronous
Status
Registration opens April 15
Description
Have you ever wondered if humans will eventually fall in love with robots? Do you question what robots think about when they are alone or if robots will eventually be able to dream? Do you worry that we may face a future of robotic soldiers and unmanned war machines? All of these questions are related to the field of artificial intelligence. Artificial intelligence (AI) is defined as the theory and development of computer systems able to perform tasks that normally require human intelligence, such as visual perception, speech recognition, decision-making, and translation between languages. In this course, you will be introduced to artificial intelligence and how it impacts or will impact both individuals and society in general. We will learn about the history and definition of intelligence and artificial intelligence, and real life applications and possible implications of AI, and will explore beliefs about AI and what the future holds for both humans and artificial machines. Emphasis will be placed on understanding the moral and ethical implications of AI.

Cults & Terrorism

Theme
Social and Cultural Understanding
Course Code
LIBS1103 (Section 2)
Delivery
In person
Status
Registration opens April 15
Description
In this course students will explore the historical evolution and social impact of cults and terrorist groups. Students will learn ways to identify and define cults. Using discussions and active learning approaches, students will examine what motivates cults and terrorist groups with a specific lens towards violent activity. The impact of media and globalization will also be discussed. Students will advance their social and cultural understanding and gain awareness of the place of cults in contemporary society. Students in this course will discuss the validity of historical evidence and research historical interpretations of events using relevant and recent sources.

Cults & Terrorism

Theme
Social and Cultural Understanding
Course Code
LIBS1103 (Section 1)
Delivery
Online - Synchronous
Status
Registration opens April 15
Description
In this course students will explore the historical evolution and social impact of cults and terrorist groups. Students will learn ways to identify and define cults. Using discussions and active learning approaches, students will examine what motivates cults and terrorist groups with a specific lens towards violent activity. The impact of media and globalization will also be discussed. Students will advance their social and cultural understanding and gain awareness of the place of cults in contemporary society. Students in this course will discuss the validity of historical evidence and research historical interpretations of events using relevant and recent sources.

Every Child Matters

Theme
Social and Cultural Understanding
Course Code
LIBS1235 (Section 1)
Delivery
In person
Status
Registration opens April 15
Description
This course unpacks traditional childrearing practices, the role of children in Indigenous communities from pre-contact until today, how the traditional Indigenous family structure differs in terms of childrearing, and responsibilities of both children and caregivers. It traces the journey from Residential schools to 60s scoop to the current state of Indigenous child welfare today, exploring on and off reserve education for Indigenous children, as well as issues faced by Indigenous children in contemporary colonial school systems. Issues in health care, Jordan's Principle, treaty rights for Indigenous children will also be covered.

Indigenous Peoples' Experience with Loss and Recovery

Theme
Social and Cultural Understanding
Course Code
LIBS1255 (Section 2)
Delivery
Online - Asynchronous / Synchronous
Status
Registration opens April 15
Description
This foundational course unpacks the history of Indigenous peoples in Canada and the role of the Indian Act in establishing colonial systems in which Indigenous peoples were not meant to thrive and survive. Often Indigenous individuals, families and communities struggle accessing culturally relevant and responsive services. Many report feeling further marginalized, misunderstood and discriminated against when attempting to seek out assistance across many different industries, including but not limited to education, health care and justice systems, as well as across public service sectors. The aim of this course is to unpack the history of colonialism, examine the impact on present day Indigenous communities, and establish more effective and better informed approaches and protocols for working with Indigenous communities. Participants will come away with a better understanding of the importance of the TRC's 94 Calls to action and their responsibility to take an active role in achieving these goals as professionals.

Indigenous Studies: Truth and Reconciliation

Theme
Social and Cultural Understanding
Course Code
LIBS1920 (Section 1)
Delivery
Online - Synchronous
Status
Registration opens April 15
Description
This course explores Canada’s First Nations people’s relationships with land, resources, cultures, and each other, as well as historical and contemporary relationships between Aboriginal people and settler governments in Canada. The course includes an overview of Indigenous cultures, colonialism, cultural and political re-emergence, and the importance of the wampum belt. The Truth and Reconciliation Report, UN Declaration of the Rights of Indigenous People, the Royal Commission on Aboriginal people, and the Ipperwash Inquiry will serve as core learning tools. Supporting the maintenance and revitalization of traditional indigenous values, languages, cultural identity and spirituality is highlighted. This is an experiential course and participation is required. Field trips will include a visit to the Residential School in Brantford, the building of a sweat lodge, and a visit to Crawford Lake.

Reconciliation for Professionals

Theme
Social and Cultural Understanding
Course Code
LIBS1245 (Section 2)
Delivery
In person
Status
Registration opens April 15
Description
This foundational course unpacks the history of Indigenous peoples in Canada and the role of the Indian Act in establishing colonial systems in which Indigenous peoples were not meant to thrive and survive. Often Indigenous individuals, families and communities struggle accessing culturally relevant and responsive services. Many report feeling further marginalized, misunderstood and discriminated against when attempting to seek out assistance across many different industries, including but not limited to education, health care and justice systems, as well as across public service sectors. The aim of this course is to unpack the history of colonialism, examine the impact on present day Indigenous communities, and establish more effective and better informed approaches and protocols for working with Indigenous communities. Participants will come away with a better understanding of the importance of the TRC's 94 Calls to action and their responsibility to take an active role in achieving these goals as professionals.

Spanish and Culture and Language I

Theme
Social and Cultural Understanding
Course Code
SPAN1000 (Section 3)
Delivery
In person
Status
Registration opens April 15
Description
This introductory course explores Spanish language and culture with a focus on Latin America. Students will use basic grammar structures in writing, speaking, and reading and explore historical, social, and cultural events in Latin America. It is recommended that students with native or near native proficiency, heritage speakers or those with Spanish as their first language, please contact the School of Interdisciplinary Studies before registering.

Introduction to the Social Sciences

Theme
Civic Life
Course Code
LIBS1520 (Section 11)
Delivery
Online - Synchronous
Status
Registration opens April 15
Description
In order to live responsibly and to reach ones potential as an individual, and as a citizen of society, there is a need to understand the patterns of human relationships that underlie the orderly interactions of a society's various structural units. Informed people have knowledge of the meaning of civic life in relation to diverse communities at the local, national and global level. This course will teach the basic principles and vocabulary of the social science disciplines — economics, sociology, and politics. It will introduce students to the intellectual frameworks of these disciplines and will emphasize the development of critical thinking by focusing on inequalities in contemporary Canadian society. Students will be provided with an understanding of the meaning of freedoms, rights, and participation in community and public life, in addition to a working knowledge of the structure and function of various levels of governments in Canada. The course will contribute to the development of citizens who are conscious of the diversity, complexity, and richness of the human experience, who are able to establish meaning through this consciousness, and, who, as a result, are able to contribute thoughtfully, creatively, and positively to the society in which they live and work.

French Culture and Language I

Theme
Social and Cultural Understanding
Course Code
FREN1000 (Section 3)
Delivery
Online - Synchronous
Status
Registration opens April 15
Description
This introductory course explores the integrated facets of francophone culture and language with a focus on Canada. Students will attain an understanding of the contributions of French Canadian culture within the social and global environment while building basic linguistic aspects of the French language. The cultural components of the course will be taught in English with basic French vocabulary and language skills introduced throughout the units. Cultural components comprise 60% of the course, with language functions comprising 40%.

Haudenosaunee World View and Way of Life

Theme
Social and Cultural Understanding
Course Code
LIBS1225 (Section 3)
Delivery
Online - Synchronous
Status
Registration opens April 15
Description
This course will provide students with an understanding of Haudenosaunee world view as the basis of Haudenosaunee way of life. Students will learn from the oral traditions passed down through the many generations of the Haudenosaunee people. Traditional teachings such as the creation story and the Ganohonyohk “Thanksgiving Address“ will be discussed. There will be an overview of the establishment of the Haudenosaunee clan system, cycle of ceremonies, the Gayensrago'wah “The Great Law of Peace“, family relationships, and the concept of the Ganihgohi'yo “the good mind“. A historical impact from the time of contact with European nations will be reviewed which will lead to the discussion of the teachings of Sganyadaiyo “Handsome Lake“. In conclusion of the course, a look at living the Haudenosaunee way of life in modern society.

Avatars to Vampires

Theme
Arts in Society
Course Code
LIBS1940 (Section 1)
Delivery
In person
Status
Registration opens April 15
Description
Do you sometimes feel more at home battling strangers’ avatars in a war zone than walking down the halls of your own school? Or do you ever wonder why humans have suddenly decided that predatory monsters like vampires might make good lovers? Useful answers to these questions require a clear understanding of human identity. Over time, our ideas about identity have undergone many changes in terms of human nature and value.

The Art of Rock

Theme
Arts in Society
Course Code
LIBS1900 (Section 1)
Delivery
Online - Synchronous
Status
Registration opens April 15
Description
The goal of this course is to take rock seriously as a musical form (where it came from, what formal structures it follows and how different styles evolved) and interpret how it impacted, and was influenced by, the cultural climate of each decade from the 1950s to the 1990s. Lessons will focus on diverse subgenres such as early rock ‘n’ roll, rhythm and blues, girl groups, the folk revival, surf, funk, soul, the British Invasion, psychedelic rock, stadium rock, early hip-hop, punk, heavy metal, MTV pop, Canadian rock and alternative

Viewing Philosophy Through Film

Theme
Arts in Society / Personal Understanding
Course Code
LIBS1660 (Section 2)
Delivery
Online - Synchronous
Status
Registration opens April 15
Description
In this course, we will learn about philosophy by watching and discussing great works of cinema. What can the screen upon which moving images are projected teach us about science, the question of God, the pursuit of knowledge, ethics, reality, violence, love, hope, evil, nothingness, absurdity and ourselves as human beings? Students who complete this course will have a good working knowledge of the history of philosophy. Reading selections may vary from year to year. This course you will help students to inquire into complex problems and begin to formulate their own philosophy. Students will learn effective methods of inquiry, analysis, and criticism. The study of philosophy develops one's ability to think carefully and critically. The objective of this course is to enable students to be reflective about the beliefs that they or their society have developed. The ability to think reflectively does not develop independently from the ability to read critically and perceptively or the ability to express ourselves. Thus, in this course we will seek to advance our reading comprehension as well as our communication skills, both oral and written.

Costa Rica: A Case Study on Happiness

Theme
Arts in Society / Social and Cultural Understanding
Course Code
LIBS2080 (Section 2)
Delivery
Online - Synchronous
Status
Registration opens April 15
Description
This course, with an optional study abroad component, examines the cultural, social, and linguistic make-up of present-day Costa Rica to address the question “how do you achieve happiness?“. The course also focuses on cultural competency and understanding and experiencing different cultures. Students will reflect on their lived experiences, challenge assumptions, and strive to become better global citizens. The travel portion of the course takes place over a 2-week period during intersession. Online (asynchronous and synchronous) sessions are held before (5 weeks) and after the trip (3 weeks) to ensure students are prepared and can engage meaningfully with their peers and with Indigenous Knowledge Holders.

Introduction to World Culture

Theme
Arts in Society / Social and Cultural Understanding / Personal Understanding / Civic Life
Course Code
LIBS1680 (Section 1)
Delivery
Online - Synchronous
Status
Registration opens April 15
Description
In order to enhance an individual's sense of personal understanding and contribution to civic life, there must be a willingness and ability to appreciate others' cultural similarities and differences. In this course, students will, through a variety of mediums, examine a number of world cultures, specifically their economic, environmental, political, and social characteristics while furthering a respect for cultural and religious diversity.

Student Success in Higher Learning

Theme
Civic Life / Personal Understanding
Course Code
LIBS1540 (Section 9, 10 )
Delivery
Online - Synchronous
Status
Registration opens April 15
Description
This course enables students to know and believe in themselves by taking advantage of resources and opportunities that will support their success in college. Students will identify their unique learning styles and develop strategies for achieving their academic, career and personal goals for reaching personal satisfaction.

Essentials of Canadian History

Theme
Civic Life / Social and Cultural Understanding
Course Code
LIBS1160 (Section 1)
Delivery
Online - Synchronous
Status
Registration opens April 15
Description
This course is a study of some of the major themes of Canadian history from Confederation to the present. It is designed to increase the student's understanding of how our past influences and engages with the present, and how we are shaping our future.

Multiculturalism: The Canadian Diversity Project

Theme
Civic Life / Social and Cultural Understanding
Course Code
LIBS1580 (Section 1)
Delivery
Online - Synchronous
Status
Registration opens April 15
Description
In this course students will critically identify and examine issues of diversity in Canada. Students will examine and appraise past, present, and future issues of the Canadian multicultural and diversity project. Students will develop an understanding of the impact of colonialism on the Indigenous Peoples, the immigration policies of a developing country, the legal and social impacts of the Canadian Multicultural Act and the Charter of Rights and Freedoms, and the struggle for identity maintenance in French Quebec and among Indigenous Peoples. This course will examine the experience of new Canadians and the challenges of developing a national identity. Issues of emerging concepts such as 'the global citizen' will also be examined.

Concepts in Gender

Theme
Personal Understanding
Course Code
LIBS1055 (Section 2, 3)
Delivery
Online - Synchronous
Status
Registration opens April 15
Description
This course will familiarize students with the key contemporary and historical issues and concepts of gender diversity. These issues will be examined from an interdisciplinary perspective. Students will examine the intersection between gender and sexuality and such realities as social class, age, race, ethnicity, health status and colonialism. Gender and sexuality-based power differences will be a theme throughout the course.

Human Sexuality

Theme
Personal Understanding
Course Code
LIBS1260 (Section 2)
Delivery
In person
Status
Registration opens April 15
Description
The purpose of this course is to understand the essential dimensions of Human Sexuality which include psychological, physiological and sociological perspectives. The student will be able to describe and critically discuss many aspects of sexual behaviour and critically examine personal attitudes towards various sexual expression.

Human Sexuality

Theme
Personal Understanding
Course Code
LIBS1260 (Section 3)
Delivery
Online - Synchronous
Status
Registration opens April 15
Description
The purpose of this course is to understand the essential dimensions of Human Sexuality which include psychological, physiological and sociological perspectives. The student will be able to describe and critically discuss many aspects of sexual behaviour and critically examine personal attitudes towards various sexual expression.

Environmental Science

Theme
Science and Technology
Course Code
LIBS1910 (Section 2)
Delivery
In person
Status
Registration opens April 15
Description
This course will focus on all the natural elements of the environment. Man will be treated as just one of those elements. How man uses and abuses other elements will be balanced with the study of changes that man can neither cause nor prevent. Population growth study will be balanced by comparing developed nations with developing ones and their respective lifestyles. Debate from all sides of any issue will be critical. Group seminars will bring the Canadian and local experience to the classroom.

Introduction to Astronomy

Theme
Science and Technology
Course Code
LIBS1170 (Section 2)
Delivery
In person
Status
Registration opens April 15
Description
In this course, the student will acquire a basic understanding of the universe, what it is made of, and the inter-relationships between galaxies, stars, and planets. The course begins with a brief overview of astronomy including discussions on the motion of stars and planets, the cycles of the moon, the history of astronomy, and an introduction to telescopes. In the next section of this course, students learn about our solar system with an emphasis on comparative planetology, and will take part in discussions of life on other planets. The course continues with a deeper understanding of stars: what they are made of, how they are formed, and how they evolve. In the final part, students will take a look at the nature of galaxies, cosmology, and current ideas regarding space and time.

Weather and Climate

Theme
Science and Technology
Course Code
LIBS1460 (Section 1)
Delivery
Online - Synchronous
Status
Registration opens April 15
Description
Focuses on principles that enable students to attain basic understanding of the atmosphere and its processes. Students examine how information is gathered and presented in a weather forecast. They investigate human activity and its impact on ozone depletion, air quality and climate.

Artificial Intelligence: Rise of the Machines

Theme
Social and Cultural Understanding
Course Code
LIBS1095 (Section 3,8)
Delivery
In person
Status
Registration opens April 15
Description
Have you ever wondered if humans will eventually fall in love with robots? Do you question what robots think about when they are alone or if robots will eventually be able to dream? Do you worry that we may face a future of robotic soldiers and unmanned war machines? All of these questions are related to the field of artificial intelligence. Artificial intelligence (AI) is defined as the theory and development of computer systems able to perform tasks that normally require human intelligence, such as visual perception, speech recognition, decision-making, and translation between languages. In this course, you will be introduced to artificial intelligence and how it impacts or will impact both individuals and society in general. We will learn about the history and definition of intelligence and artificial intelligence, and real life applications and possible implications of AI, and will explore beliefs about AI and what the future holds for both humans and artificial machines. Emphasis will be placed on understanding the moral and ethical implications of AI.

Haudenosaunee World View and Way of Life

Theme
Social and Cultural Understanding
Course Code
LIBS1225 (Section 1)
Delivery
Online - Synchronous
Status
Registration opens April 15
Description
This course will provide students with an understanding of Haudenosaunee world view as the basis of Haudenosaunee way of life. Students will learn from the oral traditions passed down through the many generations of the Haudenosaunee people. Traditional teachings such as the creation story and the Ganohonyohk “Thanksgiving Address“ will be discussed. There will be an overview of the establishment of the Haudenosaunee clan system, cycle of ceremonies, the Gayensrago'wah “The Great Law of Peace“, family relationships, and the concept of the Ganihgohi'yo “the good mind“. A historical impact from the time of contact with European nations will be reviewed which will lead to the discussion of the teachings of Sganyadaiyo “Handsome Lake“. In conclusion of the course, a look at living the Haudenosaunee way of life in modern society.

Indigenous Studies: Truth and Reconciliation

Theme
Social and Cultural Understanding
Course Code
LIBS1920 (Section 2)
Delivery
Online - Synchronous
Status
Registration opens April 15
Description
This course explores Canada’s First Nations people’s relationships with land, resources, cultures, and each other, as well as historical and contemporary relationships between Aboriginal people and settler governments in Canada. The course includes an overview of Indigenous cultures, colonialism, cultural and political re-emergence, and the importance of the wampum belt. The Truth and Reconciliation Report, UN Declaration of the Rights of Indigenous People, the Royal Commission on Aboriginal people, and the Ipperwash Inquiry will serve as core learning tools. Supporting the maintenance and revitalization of traditional indigenous values, languages, cultural identity and spirituality is highlighted. This is an experiential course and participation is required. Field trips will include a visit to the Residential School in Brantford, the building of a sweat lodge, and a visit to Crawford Lake.

Reconciliation for Professionals

Theme
Social and Cultural Understanding
Course Code
LIBS1245 (Section 1)
Delivery
Online - Synchronous
Status
Registration opens April 15
Description
This foundational course unpacks the history of Indigenous peoples in Canada and the role of the Indian Act in establishing colonial systems in which Indigenous peoples were not meant to thrive and survive. Often Indigenous individuals, families and communities struggle accessing culturally relevant and responsive services. Many report feeling further marginalized, misunderstood and discriminated against when attempting to seek out assistance across many different industries, including but not limited to education, health care and justice systems, as well as across public service sectors. The aim of this course is to unpack the history of colonialism, examine the impact on present day Indigenous communities, and establish more effective and better informed approaches and protocols for working with Indigenous communities. Participants will come away with a better understanding of the importance of the TRC's 94 Calls to action and their responsibility to take an active role in achieving these goals as professionals.

Children's Literature Across Cultures

Theme
Arts in Society
Course Code
LIBS1015 (Section 2,3,4)
Delivery
Online - Asynchronous
Status
Registration opens April 15
Description
Children across the globe engage with stories as a way of learning about the world and their place within it. What can stories aimed at children tell us about ourselves and our social, political, and cultural world? What can these stories reveal about the values our society wishes to see in its children? How do changing perceptions of childhood shape the kinds of books (stories, plays, poems, and so on) that children’s authors produce? This course aims to answer these questions by introducing students to some of the major patterns and themes found in Children’s Literature written in English, with a focus on international texts. Topics to be explored may include family structures, friendship (and other social relationships such as insider/outsider, allies, stranger, or even enemy), community, identity, self-image, adventure, tradition, and the difficult but necessary process of growing up.

Science Fiction

Theme
Arts in Society
Course Code
LIBS1930 (Section 5, 6)
Delivery
Online - Asynchronous
Status
Registration opens April 15
Description
This course will explore science fiction which deals with the effects of possible changes in the levels of science and technology on individual human beings and their societies. Drawing on literature, film, T.V., and other aspects of popular culture, students will examine themes such as utopias, dystopias, space travel, artificial intelligence, aliens, gender roles, etc. and will develop an awareness of both the implications of the transformation of our present technological knowledge and the ethical issues which will face us all. Students will understand the role of science fiction as one of the most popular and thought provoking genres of this century and the next generation.

The Middle Ages and the Modern World: Facts and Fiction

Theme
Arts in Society
Course Code
LIBS1870 (Section 2)
Delivery
Online - Asynchronous
Status
Registration opens April 15
Description
The course will provide students with an introduction to the impact that major cultural traditions of the Middle Ages have had on the modern world. The course will include myths, narratives, images, and other forms of representation from a variety of Western European national and religious traditions. Topics may include the study of kings, warriors, saints, knights, mystics, mythological heroes, and exotic beasts such as dragons. It will also include examinations of medieval-themed material in modern popular culture, including fictional writing, movies, video games, businesses and historic sites, both online and offline. No prior knowledge of medieval studies is required.

Thinking Through Zombies

Theme
Arts in Society
Course Code
LIBS1950 (Section 1, 2)
Delivery
Online - Asynchronous
Status
Registration opens April 15
Description
This course explores the meaning of the undead. The course begins with asking what zombies’ popularity reflects about our culture and civilization. Readings, films and discussions will focus on critical evaluation and reflection about the zombie trope that include lessons about racism, slavery, anxiety about the body, cannibalism, genocide, panic and plague, gender, war and social-economic structures. Students will have the opportunity to explore in depth contemporary and historical representations of zombies, and to develop a conclusion about the significance of those representations in the search for meaning.

Introduction to the Social Sciences

Theme
Civic Life
Course Code
LIBS1520 (Section 5,6,7,8)
Delivery
Online - Asynchronous
Status
Registration opens April 15
Description
In order to live responsibly and to reach ones potential as an individual, and as a citizen of society, there is a need to understand the patterns of human relationships that underlie the orderly interactions of a society's various structural units. Informed people have knowledge of the meaning of civic life in relation to diverse communities at the local, national and global level. This course will teach the basic principles and vocabulary of the social science disciplines — economics, sociology, and politics. It will introduce students to the intellectual frameworks of these disciplines and will emphasize the development of critical thinking by focusing on inequalities in contemporary Canadian society. Students will be provided with an understanding of the meaning of freedoms, rights, and participation in community and public life, in addition to a working knowledge of the structure and function of various levels of governments in Canada. The course will contribute to the development of citizens who are conscious of the diversity, complexity, and richness of the human experience, who are able to establish meaning through this consciousness, and, who, as a result, are able to contribute thoughtfully, creatively, and positively to the society in which they live and work.

Issues in Canadian Politics

Theme
Civic Life
Course Code
LIBS1420 (Section 6)
Delivery
Online - Asynchronous
Status
Registration opens April 15
Description
This course is designed to introduce the student to the study of politics within the Canadian context. Students will examine and discuss our political institutions, processes and issues in order to better understand the problems faced by citizens of a functioning democracy.

Student Success in Higher Learning

Theme
Civic Life / Personal Understanding
Course Code
LIBS1540 (Section 13)
Delivery
Online - Asynchronous
Status
Registration opens April 15
Description
This course enables students to know and believe in themselves by taking advantage of resources and opportunities that will support their success in college. Students will identify their unique learning styles and develop strategies for achieving their academic, career and personal goals for reaching personal satisfaction.

Essentials of Canadian History

Theme
Civic Life / Social and Cultural Understanding
Course Code
LIBS1160 (Section 7)
Delivery
Online - Asynchronous
Status
Registration opens April 15
Description
This course is a study of some of the major themes of Canadian history from Confederation to the present. It is designed to increase the student's understanding of how our past influences and engages with the present, and how we are shaping our future.

Cyberpsychology: Self and Others in a Wired World

Theme
Personal Understanding
Course Code
LIBS1970 (Section 2, 3, 4)
Delivery
Online - Asynchronous
Status
Registration opens April 15
Description
Cyberpsychology is the study of what happens to the human psyche, human emotions, behaviours, 'selves' and group dynamics when engaging with online technologies. Students will be introduced to theories and research concerning online technologies and how online technology change us, and influences our attitudes and behaviour. Topics related to this concept include beliefs about the self, identity formation, self-presentation, social comparison, and interpersonal relationships (friendship and romantic relationship). Emphasis will be placed on the application of social psychological principles to our understanding of behaviour in online settings, with particular emphasis on development of the self.

Human Sexuality

Theme
Personal Understanding
Course Code
LIBS1260 (Section 10)
Delivery
Online - Asynchronous
Status
Registration opens April 15
Description
The purpose of this course is to understand the essential dimensions of Human Sexuality which include psychological, physiological and sociological perspectives. The student will be able to describe and critically discuss many aspects of sexual behaviour and critically examine personal attitudes towards various sexual expression.

Environmental Science

Theme
Science and Technology
Course Code
LIBS1910 (Section 6)
Delivery
Online - Asynchronous
Status
Registration opens April 15
Description
This course will focus on all the natural elements of the environment. Man will be treated as just one of those elements. How man uses and abuses other elements will be balanced with the study of changes that man can neither cause nor prevent. Population growth study will be balanced by comparing developed nations with developing ones and their respective lifestyles. Debate from all sides of any issue will be critical. Group seminars will bring the Canadian and local experience to the classroom.

Life Beyond Earth

Theme
Science and Technology
Course Code
LIBS1980 (Section 1,2,3)
Delivery
Online - Asynchronous
Status
Registration opens April 15
Description
The question of life beyond Earth is one of the oldest in human history. It has inspired countless stories and legends, and a modern mythology that has become a multi-billion dollar entertainment industry. It has driven our efforts in space exploration and lead to many scientific advances. With the recent development of methods to discover and study planets outside our solar system we are making great strides towards answering the question of life elsewhere in the universe. To date over a thousand exoplanets have been confirmed, some of which appear to offer conditions similar to those on Earth. In this course we will begin with a study of our own solar system, what makes life possible here on Earth, and whether there may be life in other parts of our solar system. We will next examine what life is, the requirements for life, and how life originated and evolved on Earth, with a view to considering how and where extraterrestrial life may exist. Then we will learn how planets in other solar systems are being discovered and studied, and we will help look for new planets. Next we will turn our attention to the search for extraterrestrial intelligence (SETI) and learn about the methods and problems involved in trying to find and make contact with other civilizations. Finally we will consider the possibilities of human life beyond Earth, in the forms of colonization and space exploration. Throughout the course we will further explore selected topics through participation in citizen science projects that allow ordinary people to help make scientific discoveries. We will also read selected short science fiction works, considering their scientific validity and what they say about human hopes and fears as we consider whether or not we are alone in the universe.

Restless Planet: Understanding Natural Disasters

Theme
Science and Technology
Course Code
LIBS1990 (Section 2)
Delivery
Online - Asynchronous
Status
Registration opens April 15
Description
In this course, students will examine the dynamic interrelationships between physical (geological, atmospheric and hydrological) processes that cause various natural disasters, including earthquakes, tsunami, volcanoes, tornadoes, hurricanes, floods, landslides, wildfires, and weather related hazards. The main emphasis is to provide the students the tools to apply scientific concepts to our everyday experiences of natural disasters. Through scientific inquiry and active learning, such as case studies, interactive lectures, and assignments, the students will learn to analyze and evaluate the impact of the natural disasters on human population (environmental, socio-economic, political, cultural.)

Artificial Intelligence: Rise of the Machines

Theme
Social and Cultural Understanding
Course Code
LIBS1095 (Section 6,5)
Delivery
Online - Asynchronous
Status
Registration opens April 15
Description
Have you ever wondered if humans will eventually fall in love with robots? Do you question what robots think about when they are alone or if robots will eventually be able to dream? Do you worry that we may face a future of robotic soldiers and unmanned war machines? All of these questions are related to the field of artificial intelligence. Artificial intelligence (AI) is defined as the theory and development of computer systems able to perform tasks that normally require human intelligence, such as visual perception, speech recognition, decision-making, and translation between languages. In this course, you will be introduced to artificial intelligence and how it impacts or will impact both individuals and society in general. We will learn about the history and definition of intelligence and artificial intelligence, and real life applications and possible implications of AI, and will explore beliefs about AI and what the future holds for both humans and artificial machines. Emphasis will be placed on understanding the moral and ethical implications of AI.

Cults & Terrorism

Theme
Social and Cultural Understanding
Course Code
LIBS1103 (Section 6,7)
Delivery
Online - Asynchronous
Status
Registration opens April 15
Description
In this course students will explore the historical evolution and social impact of cults and terrorist groups. Students will learn ways to identify and define cults. Using discussions and active learning approaches, students will examine what motivates cults and terrorist groups with a specific lens towards violent activity. The impact of media and globalization will also be discussed. Students will advance their social and cultural understanding and gain awareness of the place of cults in contemporary society. Students in this course will discuss the validity of historical evidence and research historical interpretations of events using relevant and recent sources.

French Culture and Language I

Theme
Social and Cultural Understanding
Course Code
FREN1000 (Section 2)
Delivery
Online - Asynchronous
Status
Registration opens April 15
Description
This introductory course explores the integrated facets of francophone culture and language with a focus on Canada. Students will attain an understanding of the contributions of French Canadian culture within the social and global environment while building basic linguistic aspects of the French language. The cultural components of the course will be taught in English with basic French vocabulary and language skills introduced throughout the units. Cultural components comprise 60% of the course, with language functions comprising 40%.

Psychology Today: The Human Connection

Theme
Social and Cultural Understanding
Course Code
LIBS1085 (Section 1,2)
Delivery
Online - Asynchronous
Status
Registration opens April 15
Description
Why are cell phones so addictive? Are humans actually getting smarter with access to more information or are we just becoming “pancake people” or superficial consumers of information? Are people becoming more narcissistic? Why is being in love so powerful and how does it affect our brain? Why do people commit school shootings and other atrocities? Will we eventually be able to upload our consciousness? Does using social media cause depression? Or are we becoming lonelier as we become more connected? Why are people so influenced by trends in the media? Psychology can help start answering all of these questions. Psychology is the scientific study of human thoughts, emotions and behaviours. Topics of interest to psychologists include all aspects of everyday life, from simple to complex thoughts to behaviours that might surprise us. This course introduces students to the human psyche by drawing on some of the hot topics in psychology today. This course is structured around themes pulled from media and research, and will delve into psychological explanations of these phenomena. Topics will explore what psychology is and does; the brain; cyberpsychology and technology; intelligence; interpersonal relationships and interactions; parenting, personality; consciousness; social psychology and psychological disorders.

Spanish Culture and Language I

Theme
Social and Cultural Understanding
Course Code
SPAN1000 (Section 1,2)
Delivery
Online - Asynchronous
Status
Registration opens April 15
Description
This introductory course explores Spanish language and culture with a focus on Latin America. Students will use basic grammar structures in writing, speaking, and reading and explore historical, social, and cultural events in Latin America. It is recommended that students with native or near native proficiency, heritage speakers or those with Spanish as their first language, please contact the School of Interdisciplinary Studies before registering.

Children's Literature Across Cultures

Theme
Arts in Society
Course Code
LIBS1015 (Section 1)
Delivery
Online - Asynchronous
Status
Registration opens April 15
Description
Children across the globe engage with stories as a way of learning about the world and their place within it. What can stories aimed at children tell us about ourselves and our social, political, and cultural world? What can these stories reveal about the values our society wishes to see in its children? How do changing perceptions of childhood shape the kinds of books (stories, plays, poems, and so on) that children’s authors produce? This course aims to answer these questions by introducing students to some of the major patterns and themes found in Children’s Literature written in English, with a focus on international texts. Topics to be explored may include family structures, friendship (and other social relationships such as insider/outsider, allies, stranger, or even enemy), community, identity, self-image, adventure, tradition, and the difficult but necessary process of growing up.

Science Fiction

Theme
Arts in Society
Course Code
LIBS1930 (Section 4)
Delivery
Online - Asynchronous
Status
Registration opens April 15
Description
This course will explore science fiction which deals with the effects of possible changes in the levels of science and technology on individual human beings and their societies. Drawing on literature, film, T.V., and other aspects of popular culture, students will examine themes such as utopias, dystopias, space travel, artificial intelligence, aliens, gender roles, etc. and will develop an awareness of both the implications of the transformation of our present technological knowledge and the ethical issues which will face us all. Students will understand the role of science fiction as one of the most popular and thought provoking genres of this century and the next generation.

The Middle Ages and the Modern World: Facts and Fiction

Theme
Arts in Society
Course Code
LIBS1870 (Section 1)
Delivery
Online - Asynchronous
Status
Registration opens April 15
Description
The course will provide students with an introduction to the impact that major cultural traditions of the Middle Ages have had on the modern world. The course will include myths, narratives, images, and other forms of representation from a variety of Western European national and religious traditions. Topics may include the study of kings, warriors, saints, knights, mystics, mythological heroes, and exotic beasts such as dragons. It will also include examinations of medieval-themed material in modern popular culture, including fictional writing, movies, video games, businesses and historic sites, both online and offline. No prior knowledge of medieval studies is required.

Introduction to the Social Sciences

Theme
Civic Life
Course Code
LIBS1520 (Section 4)
Delivery
Online - Asynchronous
Status
Registration opens April 15
Description
In order to live responsibly and to reach ones potential as an individual, and as a citizen of society, there is a need to understand the patterns of human relationships that underlie the orderly interactions of a society's various structural units. Informed people have knowledge of the meaning of civic life in relation to diverse communities at the local, national and global level. This course will teach the basic principles and vocabulary of the social science disciplines — economics, sociology, and politics. It will introduce students to the intellectual frameworks of these disciplines and will emphasize the development of critical thinking by focusing on inequalities in contemporary Canadian society. Students will be provided with an understanding of the meaning of freedoms, rights, and participation in community and public life, in addition to a working knowledge of the structure and function of various levels of governments in Canada. The course will contribute to the development of citizens who are conscious of the diversity, complexity, and richness of the human experience, who are able to establish meaning through this consciousness, and, who, as a result, are able to contribute thoughtfully, creatively, and positively to the society in which they live and work.

Issues in Canadian Politics

Theme
Civic Life
Course Code
LIBS1420 (Section 4,5)
Delivery
Online - Asynchronous
Status
Registration opens April 15
Description
This course is designed to introduce the student to the study of politics within the Canadian context. Students will examine and discuss our political institutions, processes and issues in order to better understand the problems faced by citizens of a functioning democracy.

Cyberpsychology: Self and Others in a Wired World

Theme
Personal Understanding
Course Code
LIBS1970 (Section 1)
Delivery
Online - Asynchronous
Status
Registration opens April 15
Description
Cyberpsychology is the study of what happens to the human psyche, human emotions, behaviours, 'selves' and group dynamics when engaging with online technologies. Students will be introduced to theories and research concerning online technologies and how online technology change us, and influences our attitudes and behaviour. Topics related to this concept include beliefs about the self, identity formation, self-presentation, social comparison, and interpersonal relationships (friendship and romantic relationship). Emphasis will be placed on the application of social psychological principles to our understanding of behaviour in online settings, with particular emphasis on development of the self.

Human Sexuality

Theme
Personal Understanding
Course Code
LIBS1260 (Section 6,7)
Delivery
Online - Asynchronous
Status
Registration opens April 15
Description
The purpose of this course is to understand the essential dimensions of Human Sexuality which include psychological, physiological and sociological perspectives. The student will be able to describe and critically discuss many aspects of sexual behaviour and critically examine personal attitudes towards various sexual expression.

Blood From a Stone: Social and Environmental Consequences of Mining

Theme
Science and Technology
Course Code
LIBS1135 (Section 1)
Delivery
Online - Asynchronous
Status
Registration opens April 15
Description
This course will focus on the basic geological and chemical science behind mining, and also explore the social and environmental consequences of mining jewels (for example, diamonds), rare earth (Uranium, Colton), and fossil fuels. We will learn about the chemicals and elements needed to make a range of products, from diamond rings to cellphones. We will learn about geological / mining systems, as well as the legal, cultural, professional and ethical implications of mining.

Environmental Science

Theme
Science and Technology
Course Code
LIBS1910 (Section 5)
Delivery
Online - Asynchronous
Status
Registration opens April 15
Description
This course will focus on all the natural elements of the environment. Man will be treated as just one of those elements. How man uses and abuses other elements will be balanced with the study of changes that man can neither cause nor prevent. Population growth study will be balanced by comparing developed nations with developing ones and their respective lifestyles. Debate from all sides of any issue will be critical. Group seminars will bring the Canadian and local experience to the classroom.

Oceans

Theme
Science and Technology
Course Code
LIBS1035 (Section 3)
Delivery
Online - Asynchronous
Status
Registration opens April 15
Description
This course will help students to appreciate the interactions that occur between various natural processes in the oceans on a planetary scale. The students will develop an enhanced awareness of how the oceans influence humans’ everyday life. They will better understand the processes that shape and transform the components of the Earth systems from planetary and regional prospective.

Restless Planet: Understanding Natural Disasters

Theme
Science and Technology
Course Code
LIBS1990 (Section 1)
Delivery
Online - Asynchronous
Status
Registration opens April 15
Description
In this course, students will examine the dynamic interrelationships between physical (geological, atmospheric and hydrological) processes that cause various natural disasters, including earthquakes, tsunami, volcanoes, tornadoes, hurricanes, floods, landslides, wildfires, and weather related hazards. The main emphasis is to provide the students the tools to apply scientific concepts to our everyday experiences of natural disasters. Through scientific inquiry and active learning, such as case studies, interactive lectures, and assignments, the students will learn to analyze and evaluate the impact of the natural disasters on human population (environmental, socio-economic, political, cultural.)

French Culture and Language I

Theme
Social and Cultural Understanding
Course Code
FREN1000 (Section 1)
Delivery
Online - Asynchronous
Status
Registration opens April 15
Description
This introductory course explores the integrated facets of francophone culture and language with a focus on Canada. Students will attain an understanding of the contributions of French Canadian culture within the social and global environment while building basic linguistic aspects of the French language. The cultural components of the course will be taught in English with basic French vocabulary and language skills introduced throughout the units. Cultural components comprise 60% of the course, with language functions comprising 40%.

Student Success in Higher Learning

Theme
Civic Life / Personal Understanding
Course Code
LIBS1540 (Section 14)
Delivery
Online - Asynchronous
Status
Registration opens April 15
Description
This course enables students to know and believe in themselves by taking advantage of resources and opportunities that will support their success in college. Students will identify their unique learning styles and develop strategies for achieving their academic, career and personal goals for reaching personal satisfaction.

Multiculturalism: Canadian Diversity Project

Theme
Civic Life / Social and Cultural Understanding
Course Code
LIBS1580 (Section 3)
Delivery
Online - Asynchronous
Status
Registration opens April 15
Description
In this course students will critically identify and examine issues of diversity in Canada. Students will examine and appraise past, present, and future issues of the Canadian multicultural and diversity project. Students will develop an understanding of the impact of colonialism on the Indigenous Peoples, the immigration policies of a developing country, the legal and social impacts of the Canadian Multicultural Act and the Charter of Rights and Freedoms, and the struggle for identity maintenance in French Quebec and among Indigenous Peoples. This course will examine the experience of new Canadians and the challenges of developing a national identity. Issues of emerging concepts such as 'the global citizen' will also be examined.

Student Success in Higher Learning

Theme
Civic Life / Personal Understanding
Course Code
LIBS1540 (Section 5)
Delivery
Online - Asynchronous
Status
Registration opens April 15
Description
This course enables students to know and believe in themselves by taking advantage of resources and opportunities that will support their success in college. Students will identify their unique learning styles and develop strategies for achieving their academic, career and personal goals for reaching personal satisfaction.

Multiculturalism: Canadian Diversity Project

Theme
Civic Life / Social and Cultural Understanding
Course Code
LIBS1580 (Section 4)
Delivery
Online - Asynchronous
Status
Registration opens April 15
Description
In this course students will critically identify and examine issues of diversity in Canada. Students will examine and appraise past, present, and future issues of the Canadian multicultural and diversity project. Students will develop an understanding of the impact of colonialism on the Indigenous Peoples, the immigration policies of a developing country, the legal and social impacts of the Canadian Multicultural Act and the Charter of Rights and Freedoms, and the struggle for identity maintenance in French Quebec and among Indigenous Peoples. This course will examine the experience of new Canadians and the challenges of developing a national identity. Issues of emerging concepts such as 'the global citizen' will also be examined.